allraysworld

29 Aug 2017 53 views
 
supporter of
atom rss 1.0 rss 2.0
web browser google del.icio.us digg technorati
| lost password
birth date
cancel
photoblog image Patching the rice crop

Patching the rice crop

The normal method of planting rice in this area is by hand-broadcasting seed onto the ground and then rotary-hoeing it under the surface...within a few days the seed will sprout and the fields will turn green.

 

However, things can go wrong...if there is too much rain too early after broadcasting then the sprouting seeds will drown, or the freshly sprouted seeds might be attacked by a large snail that lives in the moist land.

 

If either of these events take place then there will be big, ugly gaps in the crop, and so corrective action is called for. Healthy rice plants from another field are ripped out of the wet land in a thinning process, and transplanted in the gaps...a hard job in the hot fields, and particularly wearing on the back. Casual labourers earn about US$1.00 per hour for performing this task. Rice plants seem unconcerned by this harsh treatment.

 

Here you see a team we engaged for a few days to assist us with repairing gaps in our crop caused by marauding snails. Na provides the team with bonuses in the form of free food, and drinks both soft and alcoholic at various times during each day. It is getting harder each year to find people who are prepared to do this work, as most younger people have gone to Bangkok to find easier work in building construction [mainly women], taxi driving [mainly men] or beer-bar "hostessing" [women and men].

 

Rice Farming

Patching the rice crop

The normal method of planting rice in this area is by hand-broadcasting seed onto the ground and then rotary-hoeing it under the surface...within a few days the seed will sprout and the fields will turn green.

 

However, things can go wrong...if there is too much rain too early after broadcasting then the sprouting seeds will drown, or the freshly sprouted seeds might be attacked by a large snail that lives in the moist land.

 

If either of these events take place then there will be big, ugly gaps in the crop, and so corrective action is called for. Healthy rice plants from another field are ripped out of the wet land in a thinning process, and transplanted in the gaps...a hard job in the hot fields, and particularly wearing on the back. Casual labourers earn about US$1.00 per hour for performing this task. Rice plants seem unconcerned by this harsh treatment.

 

Here you see a team we engaged for a few days to assist us with repairing gaps in our crop caused by marauding snails. Na provides the team with bonuses in the form of free food, and drinks both soft and alcoholic at various times during each day. It is getting harder each year to find people who are prepared to do this work, as most younger people have gone to Bangkok to find easier work in building construction [mainly women], taxi driving [mainly men] or beer-bar "hostessing" [women and men].

 

Rice Farming

comments (13)

Very nice photojournalism, Ray! It seems very difficult work, as you say - though $1.00 may go farther there - it still isn't much I suppose. Good that Na provides sustenance.
Ray: I have to say that I would not like to e doing this work for that pay, Elizabeth.

I liked your compliment about photojournalism.
Impressionnant de voir ces personnes travailler dans de telles conditions ..mais j'imagine qu'il n'existe pas trop d'autres solutions , que cette plantation doit se faire manuellement !
Merci pour toutes ces explications
Bonne journée Ray
Ray: Il y a des machines pour planter du riz de cette façon, Claudine, mais je n'ai jamais vu un travail, donc je ne sais pas si cela rend le processus plus facile ou plus rapide.
  • Chris
  • England
  • 29 Aug 2017, 06:46
I'm not surprised this work isn't populat for young people who can earn a lot in the big city. It looks like back breaking stuff
Ray: It is physically challenging and uncomfortable work, Chris...not for me!
  • Philine
  • Germany
  • 29 Aug 2017, 07:04
Oh, what a hard work! Thank you for your very informative explanation- I always admire your Na for her engagement!
Ray: I try to inform on things that might be out of the usual for my Buddies, Philine.

Na is a caring employer...I have worked for bosses who could learn much from her.
  • Martine
  • France
  • 29 Aug 2017, 07:52
C'est un travail difficile avec, en plus, les pieds dans l'eau.
Ray: Oui ... l'eau et la boue rendent le travail plus fatiguant et désagréable, Martine.
It is a bit like fruit picking here. Years ago whole families would come from the cities to pick fruit and now only migrant workers are willing to do the work. What happens when we leave the EU is anybody's guess
Ray: I expect Brexit is going to reveal issues like this that Boris, Nigel and their like did not even think about when spouting their ridiculous populism, Bill.
i always admired the fresh looking green of paddy fields, Ray. interesting text that you put with that fine shot. it is a trend that i can recognize.
Ray: The old, traditional peasants' lives are undergoing significant stresses at the moment, Ayush.
It must be real back-breaking work.
Ray: I did it for a hour or so, Brian, and can attest that it is physically challenging.
  • gutteridge
  • Somewhere in deep space
  • 29 Aug 2017, 12:21
I can imagine what a tough job this is Ray.
Ray: It requires a good humour and a strong body, Chad.
  • Alan
  • Great Britain (UK)
  • 29 Aug 2017, 13:05
It looks like to be quite tiring work and I can understand why youngsters seek out something easier. It is the same here; we are wholly plaint now on workers from the EU harvesting our labour-intenstive crops and there are great concerts about the effects on Brexit. The Brits are quite happy to scrounge off Stage benefits if they can find ways of (ab)using the system.
Ray: I understand this challenge for you people with Brexit looming, Alan. Solving this issue will not be easy. What a pity Boris, Nigel and their mates didn't think about this before pushing their ridiculous populist proposals.
It looks, as you say, Ray, like pretty back-breaking work - one can understand the attraction of taxi driving!
Ray: I tried to offer some financial logic, along the lines that the cost of crop repair likely was more than the income derived, Tom, but it turns out that the prime motivator is pride in a good-looking crop!

This is one of the least desirable of farming jobs.
Quite right, Ray, and I assume there are both sides to the coin here.
Ray: Oh yes...change brings up-side as well as down-side, Ayush.
Farm and fishery labourers are very hard to find and we sometimes have to import foreign workers. Is it possible to remove snails before they do this damage?
Ray: This is a wide-spread issue, Mary, and "leaders" like Donald Duck are meddling without understanding the basics, and are making matters worse.

The snail situation is sad. The problem snails are not a native species...Thais eat the native snails that live in the rice fields, and so they were hunted&gathered for food and this kept the population under control...some bright spark came across these giant snails, and introduced them with a view that it would be a boon for the peasants...the peasants don't like the taste of these snails, and so don't gather them for food...the introduce snails are voracious feeders, and have no native enemies...plague!!! sad

Leave a comment

must fill in
[stop comment form]
show
for this photo I'm in a any and all comments icon ShMood©
camera SM-N900
exposure mode full manual
shutterspeed 1/1250s
aperture f/2.2
sensitivity ISO50
focal length 4.2mm
Khao Yai #08Khao Yai #08
Brave Hunter MekBrave Hunter Mek
Ta KwaiTa Kwai

Warning