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30 Oct 2017 49 views
 
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photoblog image A Short Walk In The Grampians #16

A Short Walk In The Grampians #16

To complete this series on a lovely region [The Grampians], in Australia, this week I'll show you a few things we see on the stroll back from Hollow Mountain to the car park.

 

First, we pass through a small copse of ancient native Pines and find that, thankfully, no-one has had a fit of mis-guided housekeeping and tried to tidy them up. Although Australia's forests are dominated by Eucalypts [about 800 different species, and varying from small shrubs to 300+ feet {100 metres} tall giants], there are also many species of conifers.

A Short Walk In The Grampians #16

To complete this series on a lovely region [The Grampians], in Australia, this week I'll show you a few things we see on the stroll back from Hollow Mountain to the car park.

 

First, we pass through a small copse of ancient native Pines and find that, thankfully, no-one has had a fit of mis-guided housekeeping and tried to tidy them up. Although Australia's forests are dominated by Eucalypts [about 800 different species, and varying from small shrubs to 300+ feet {100 metres} tall giants], there are also many species of conifers.

comments (14)

Trees are gooood!
Ray: On this we will not argue, Elizabeth!
this is indeed new info to me, Ray. i did not know there were conifers in Australia.
Ray: There are many unique species of Pines in Oz, Ayush.
  • Lisl
  • England
  • 30 Oct 2017, 05:30
Just as nature intended, Ray - I do agree. I didn't know there were so many species of eucalyptus
Ray: A different Eucalyptus species for every environment, Lisl!
La nature sait faire elle même son rangement..
Je ne savais qu'il existait autant d'especes d'eucalyptus
Bon Lundi Ray
Ray: Les eucalyptus dominent la flore australienne, Claudine.
  • Chris
  • Not Nowhere
  • 30 Oct 2017, 07:16
Just beware a Koala doesn't drop down onto your 'ead, that's all..
Ray: Ha Ha

Tomorrow...something even better than a Koala on the head, Chris.
  • Alan
  • Great Britain (UK)
  • 30 Oct 2017, 07:22
DO NOT go near there. There will be things to consume you whole in one gulp.
Ray: I'll feed your worst fears on Wednesday, Alan...just wait!
Nature will do its own tidying up
Ray: Ok...we will leave it to her then, Bill.
  • gutteridge
  • Somewhere in deep space
  • 30 Oct 2017, 08:05
I love the smell of the eucalyptus trees Ray...not here of course, that would be ridiculous. On the Camino in Nortern Spain two years past, we walked through eucalyptus trees. Our Australianisch friends were quite amazed. I am also amazed that their are so many varieties.

One tree to another. “I diversified quite a bit, do you think I can be a new specials”. Other tree, “ No mate, you haven’t done quite enough.”
Ray: Thailand has vast quantities of Eucalypts now, Chad...they grow very quickly and are sold to Green Power Companies for conversion into wood chip which is then used to fuel the electricity generators...quite polluting, but "Green" is used to mean renewable fuel.
  • Louis
  • South Africa
  • 30 Oct 2017, 11:07
And here I thought that eucalyptus, wattle and Port Jackson are the only plants in Australia. A 150 years or so ago, these plants were introduced into SA for various reasons - hedging, tanning, etc. and are now declared undesirable - especially the wattle.

OK, so one learns.
Ray: Ha ha...I learn something nearly every day from my SC Buddies [including you, Louis].

Indeed, I immediately think of the fabulous Baobab [aka Boab], which occurs in Madagascar, but also Africa and Australia.

During this week I will share Na's encounters with a couple of other Australian plants.
I took many shots yesterday of just that subject, an old broken down large, dead tree, a home to many, many tiny things.
Ray: Trees continue to be useful long after they flee their mortal coil...food, hosts, protection...
I really hope this is left to return to nature in its own time. We have a Eucalypts in our front garden, I ahve been busy trimming it down ready for winter in order that it doesn't get too large to look after.
Ray: Unless there is a bushfire, Brian, I am confident this old tree will continue to be useful for many years...in fact, it is not yet dead.
this is the way that trees should be left in the forests Ray... the only time that they are removed is if they had fallen across a road....petersmile
Ray: I share this view with you, Peter...but, there was a time when I gathered firewood with a chainsaw. sad
Strikingly beautiful...
Ray: That is what I think also, Larry.
It makes a lovely tangle!
Ray: Ha Ha

Yes...like a tangle of old chicken wire, Tom.

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