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26 Feb 2018 114 views
 
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photoblog image Open-beak Storks

Open-beak Storks

These large birds wading about in a field of young Winter rice are Open-beak Storks, the largest species of Asian Stork.

 

They are most welcome in the young rice as their main diet is the large fresh-water snail that eats young rice plants.

Open-beak Storks

These large birds wading about in a field of young Winter rice are Open-beak Storks, the largest species of Asian Stork.

 

They are most welcome in the young rice as their main diet is the large fresh-water snail that eats young rice plants.

comments (16)

They do look big - Love your photo!
Ray: They have impressive wingspans, and are expert at riding thermals, Elizabeth.
  • Astrid
  • Netherlands
  • 26 Feb 2018, 04:22
This is a great picture, Ray. Now I hope they catch a lot of snails. Love how that works..
Ray: Creates a nice ecological balance, Astrid.
we have a lot of snails around here - most of them meet their demise under the feet of humans who do not watch where they are going, Ray. in your instance, there is at least a good outcome to it, for the storks.
Ray: The storks do well, Ayush, and are helping to correct an ecological blunder when this species of large snails was deliberately introduced by a well-meaning amateur who thought they might make good human food.
Yay for the storks who know what to do/eat, Ray!
Ray: Storks are very useful critters, Ginnie.
  • Chris
  • Not Nowhere
  • 26 Feb 2018, 06:06
The beak has been adapted for what, eating snails?
Ray: That is correct, Chris...shaped like a vice for holding the snail steady while they apply pressure to crack it open.
Surprenants ces oiseaux .et tant mieux s'ils sont utiles pour les cultures
Bonne journée
Ray: Les cigognes effectuent un service utile pour les paysans, Claudine, sont donc considérés comme des Amis ... bien sûr, cela ne les empêche pas d'être chassés comme nourriture dans certaines régions de Thaïlande.
  • Alan
  • Great Britain (UK)
  • 26 Feb 2018, 06:33
Sounds like win-win then for all, then. An image with three of anything works well, as this proves.
Ray: I think the snails might mount an argument that they are not beneficiaries of this arrangement, Alan...otherwise, all good.
  • Lisl
  • England
  • 26 Feb 2018, 06:40
Can the beak close up enough to crush the snails, or are they swallowed whole, Ray
Ray: Yes...I believe the beak is adapted to a shape that makes it easier for the storks to hold the snails firmly while applying pressure to crack the shells, Lisl.
  • gutteridge
  • Somewhere in deep space
  • 26 Feb 2018, 08:18
As you might know Ray, I am not, as a rule, a fan of the border, only because it is generally done so badly. However, this is superb and sets off the image delightfully. You can take my comment as a form of approval.
Ray: You are most kind, Chad!
Great pic, Ray - useful birds to have around!
Ray: Yes...storks are good critters, Tom.
  • Louis
  • South Africa
  • 26 Feb 2018, 10:40
Open-beaks are around my part of the world as well. Friendly types.
Ray: I didn't know they were in your part of the World, Louis.

In Thailand they are quite human-shy, probably because some up-country folks regard them as free food.
I'd love to see these for real, I don't think I've ever seen a Stork.
Ray: Big birds...not the prettiest to look at when on the ground...very graceful in flight, especially when riding thermals.
I remember you telling us about the snail problem. You had a crew of people picking them. Is this a new crew?
Ray: This crew does a wonderful job, and they do it for free.

This is not our farm...we cannot grow Winter rice as we have no water then.
Good for them working in harmony with the rice farmer.
Ray: I love cooperative efforts like this, Martin.
A highly useful bird.
Ray: Wonderful big snail-eaters, Bill.
they look as big as a crane Ray... i'm glad that they help out with the snails....petersmile
Ray: They have big bodies, and enormous wings, but their legs might be shorter than those of your Crane, Peter.

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for this photo I'm in a any and all comments icon ShMood©
camera Canon EOS M
exposure mode shutter priority
shutterspeed 1/500s
aperture f/6.3
sensitivity ISO320
focal length 55.0mm
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